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Flour types in Thailand

Alfie · 33 · 3121

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Buadhai

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I also use cornmeal in some recipes and have been unable to find it in Korat. I usually buy some when in Bangkok, where it is readily available.

Maybe KoratChef could do for cornmeal what they've done for cheese and butter.

Other baking items that I can't find locally include cracked wheat and molasses.


lopezsteve

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Buadhai and Melyianna,

 Appreciate your feedback. What I neglected to mention is that the dist(BBI Co.,ltd) in Bangkok said that they sell bags of 25kg for 1200bt. Don't know have smaller. Didn't get far in the conversation.
 Will check with The Frog and the mexi place in Joho.

Thanks again,
Steve


melyianna

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if you find any, please post about it, steve.
i would like to make some cornbread too. :)


lopezsteve

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Buadhai

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Appreciate your feedback. What I neglected to mention is that the dist(BBI Co.,ltd) in Bangkok said that they sell bags of 25kg for 1200bt. Don't know have smaller. Didn't get far in the conversation.
 

That was my point about KoratChef. They buy cheese and butter in large quantities and then cut it up and package it in consumer-friendly sizes.


lopezsteve

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Buadhai,

 Already passed the info to them last night.


Offline Alfie

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Mrs Alfie bought some bread flour today: White Swan; 1kg for 32 baht. I plan to make some bread this weekend. Stotty is first on the list! I have a recipe but I'm not sure how good it is. If any of you north-easterners have a trusted recipe from your mother or granny, please send it to me.  ;)

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Buadhai

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That's the bread flour I'm using now. It's quite good. I make bread every week, but it's just a very plain sourdough bread. Sometimes I add some whole wheat flour or some oats or some cracked wheat.

If I'm feeling very ambitious, I make this one:

Beer Bread

The Sponge
   â€¢   1 cup bread flour
   â€¢   1/2 cup water
   â€¢   1 packet yeast or 1 cup sourdough starter


The mix
   â€¢   1 can of flat beer
   â€¢   1/2 cup water
   â€¢   2 tbsp butter
   â€¢   1/2 cup molasses
   â€¢   2 tsp salt
   â€¢   2/3 cup cornmeal
   â€¢   2 cups whole wheat flour
   â€¢   enough bread flour to fill out the dough (3-4 cups)

Heat the beer on the stove until it simmers. If the beer is not flat, you will need to stir it constantly -- once it hits the boiling point, it will foam up very fast. Turn off the heat, and add the water, butter, molasses cornmeal and salt. Allow it to cool (warm, not hot to the touch).
Add this mix to the sponge and stir. Add the whole wheat flour 1/2 cup at a time. Continue to add bread flour 1/2 cup at a time until it forms something remotely kneadable, then turn it out onto a very well floured surface. This is incredibly sticky dough, so be prepared to use a lot of bread flour on your hands and kneading surface! Knead for 10 minutes until the bread is no longer so sticky.

Transfer the dough to a well-oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Place in a warm spot and allow it to double in bulk, about an hour and fifteen minutes or so.

Prepare cookie sheets by covering with parchment paper and dusting with cornmeal. Or, use a bread stone or bread sheet.

Punch down the dough, then divide into 3 or four pieces. Shape them into rounds and place on cookie sheets. Cover with plastic wrap that's been greased with vegetable oil and allow it to rise until again doubled, one hour.

Twenty minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 200ºC degrees. Bake for 30 minutes or until they sound hollow when tapped on the bottom.

If you don't want so much bread you can reduce the amounts of flour.


Offline Alfie

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I've made two batches of Indian Naan bread. It was very easy to make and tasted pretty good, too. I made it more or less like the woman did in this video but without using the 'stone' she uses in her oven.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vow-kxTPatc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vow-kxTPatc</a>
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Offline Alfie

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Mrs Alfie bought some cake flour - Royal Fan brand. I'm not sure what kind of cakes she's going to make with it but it's got to be better than most Thai cakes I've eaten in Thailand. 

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« Last Edit: March 13, 2012, 09:41:06 PM by Alfie »
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Offline Alfie

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Buadhai, where do you get your molasses? I've made a few batches of gingerbread men without using molasses but some recipes include it. I wonder what the difference in taste would be.
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Offline waterheart

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WOW..... all of farangs are very good cooking.  ;D
Long live to long learn


Buadhai

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Buadhai, where do you get your molasses? I've made a few batches of gingerbread men without using molasses but some recipes include it. I wonder what the difference in taste would be.

(Sorry, I've been off scuba diving for the past week or so.)

I buy molasses in Bangkok. It's imported from Australia.

The irony is that huge amounts of molasses are produced in Korat as a byproduct of sugar cane refining. Much of it is distilled into alcohol for human consumption and the rest is mixed with silage for animal feed or used to aid in the composting of agricultural waste. AFAIK, none of it is refined enough for human consumption. It smells strongly of sulphur. I add some of the unrefined stuff to my compost heap now and then.