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American Internet Censorship

Alfie · 14 · 462

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Offline Alfie

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PROTECT-IP and SOPA will allegedly give the US government and corporations the ability to censor the internet.

According to the Congressional Budget Office, this bill would cost us $47 million tax dollars a year — that's for a fix that won't work, disrupts the internet, stifles innovation, shuts out diverse voices, and censors the internet. This bill is bad for creativity and does not protect your rights.

Sources: here and here


Do any US members have any views on this? Or further details?

There are none so blind as those who will not see.


Offline Alfie

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Mmm. No American opinions. Maybe the question wasn't right, so here's another. Is the Obama administration taking away American freedoms with this bill?  :o
There are none so blind as those who will not see.


Toddy

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The land of the free? I don't think so. Just the same way that UK has gone. The USA and UK are close bedfellows. Both f@cked up in similar ways.

At least UK has the royal family. Why do some people want yet more politicians, which would happen if UK became a republic?


walter

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Toddy

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walter

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They'll always rule - because you allow them.

Who - the Royal Family, or USA?  ;D

One and the same. The Anglo-American Establishment.


dozer

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There has been  a site blacklist In Oz for quite a while now....started with blocking access to child porn sites which I back 100%....then it went further and sites criticizing the policies of the then John Howard govt. were blocked as well as some other sites that were openly critical of "the war on terror" A full list was published on wikileaks but since the powers that be seem to have succeded in bringing that site down.......
I agree that sites such as child porn sites and race hate sies need to be blocked...but a censor is human after all and who gets to decide what is "inappropriate or offensive content" of a site and of course in a great democratic nation like Australia or America people in the censors office would not be tempted to accept bribes or be coerced into blocking a rival product or political opponents site would they???
hahahaha
Procede with caution on this on Uncle spam


melyianna

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yes, a continuation of the taking away of freedoms in the United States. and like most things in the world, it just comes down to money.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqJBzwF03F8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqJBzwF03F8</a>



melyianna

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and this is an old one but even more valid today and omg henry rollins is fine.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vF3tZtcjgf8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vF3tZtcjgf8</a>


Offline Alfie

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Thanks for those videos, Mely. I like the Henry Rollins video. It made me laugh. And I liked one image of the other video. See below.

and this is an old one but even more valid today and omg henry rollins is fine.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vF3tZtcjgf8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vF3tZtcjgf8</a>

[attachment deleted by admin]
There are none so blind as those who will not see.


Offline Alfie

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Wikipedia's webmasters aren't happy about SOPA. They say they will join a web blackout to protest against SOPA. They plan to take Wikipedia's English-language site offline on Wednesday as part of protests against proposed anti-piracy laws in the US.
There are none so blind as those who will not see.



Buadhai

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Wikipedia's webmasters aren't happy about SOPA. They say they will join a web blackout to protest against SOPA. They plan to take Wikipedia's English-language site offline on Wednesday as part of protests against proposed anti-piracy laws in the US.

I blacked out my home page and put in a link to Wikipedia's SOPA and PIPA - Learn more web page.


Online Eagle 3

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Congress withdraws SOPA, PIPA anti-piracy measures

SAN ANTONIO — Lawmakers on Friday indefinitely postponed anti-piracy legislation that pits Hollywood against Silicon Valley, two days after major Internet companies staged an online protest by blacking out parts of prominent websites.

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid postponed a showdown vote in his chamber on the Protect Intellectual Property Act, or PIPA for short, that had been scheduled for January 24.

Lamar Smith, the Republican chairman of the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, followed suit, saying his panel would delay action on similar legislation called the Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA, until there is wider agreement on the legislation.

"I have heard from the critics and I take seriously their concerns regarding proposed legislation to address the problem of online piracy," Smith told Reuters in a telephone interview.

"It is clear that we need to revisit the approach on how best to address the problem of foreign thieves that steal and sell American inventions and products," Smith said in a statement.

The bills are aimed at curbing access to overseas websites that traffic in pirated content and counterfeit products, such as movies and music. But support for the legislation has eroded in recent days because of fears that legitimate websites could end up in legal jeopardy.

The entertainment industry wants legislation to protect its movies and music from counterfeiters, but technology companies are concerned the laws would undermine Internet freedoms, be difficult to enforce and encourage frivolous lawsuits.

On Wednesday protests blanketed the Internet, turning Wikipedia and other popular websites dark for 24 hours. Google, Facebook, Twitter and others protested the proposed legislation but did not shut down.

In a brief statement, Reid said there was no reason why concerns about the legislation cannot be resolved. He offered no new date for the vote.

Reid's action comes a day after a senior Democratic aide, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the measure lacked the 60 votes needed to clear a procedural hurdle in the 100-member Senate.

A handful of senators who had co-sponsored the legislation dropped their support after Wednesday's protests started.

Reid expressed hope on Friday that Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, who has been shepherding the bill through Congress, could help resolve differences in the legislation.

"I am optimistic that we can reach a compromise in the coming weeks," Reid said.

Leahy said in a statement that he was committed to addressing online piracy and hoped other members of Congress would work with him to get a bill signed into law this year.

"But the day will come when the Senators who forced this move will look back and realize they made a knee-jerk reaction to a monumental problem," he said.

"Criminals who do nothing but peddle in counterfeit products and stolen American content are smugly watching how the United States Senate decided it was not even worth debating how to stop the overseas criminals from draining our economy," Leahy said.

Source:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46072484/ns/technology_and_science-security/#.Txmq-YFwioo
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