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Thaiphoon

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                                                        Hurt Locker Makers Target Record Breaking 24,583 BitTorrent Users


After being honored with an Oscar for best motion picture last year, the makers of The Hurt Locker have now also secured the award for the biggest file-sharing lawsuit the world has ever witnessed. By targeting at least 24,583 alleged BitTorrent users, Voltage Pictures hopes to recoup millions of dollars in settlements to compensate the studio for piracy-related losses.

March last year the law firm Dunlap, Grubb and Weaver imported the mass litigation “pay up or else” anti-piracy scheme to the United States.

The initial customers of the lawyers – who are also known as the U.S. Copyright Group – were relatively unknown indie film producers. But this changed when the makers of the Oscar-winning Hurt Locker (Voltage Pictures) joined up and sued 5,000 alleged file-sharers.

Voltage Pictures always threatened that this figure was just the start, and it now turns out that they were speaking the truth. In their quest to recoup their claimed losses, the studio has now added nearly 20,000 new defendants to the lawsuit, bringing the total up to 24,583.

This turns the Hurt Locker case into the largest BitTorrent lawsuit in history, breaking the two week old record set by The Expendables case earlier this month.

In a status report obtained by TorrentFreak, Voltage Pictures lawyers give the U.S. District Court of Columbia an overview of the massive list of alleged BitTorrent downloaders they filed complaints against. This report reveals that most defendants are subscribers of Comcast (10,532), followed by Verizon (5,239), Charter (2,699) and Time Warner (1,750).

The report also provides details on the agreements the lawyers have struck with various ISPs regarding the release of subscribers’ personal information. There is currently no agreement with Comcast, while Charter has promised to look up 150 IP-addresses a month and Verizon 100 a month for all ongoing BitTorrent lawsuits.

The above indicates that it may take several years before some ISPs hand over the requested information. It would take Verizon more than a decade to look up all the personal details in the various BitTorrent lawsuits, which begs the question of how long an ISP is allowed to store such private details.

The Hurt Locker case is currently being handled by former RIAA-lobbyist Judge Beryl Howell. She now has to decide if Voltage Pictures is allowed to proceed their legal endeavor and under what restrictions.

During the course of the year many of the defendants in the Hurt Locker case who were already subpoenaed have claimed innocence. However, last week Judge Howell decided to dismiss all 119 motions to dismiss, quash, and for protective orders en masse, adding them to the pool of targets.

Defendants whose ISPs give up their personal details are expected to receive a settlement offer from Voltage Pictures. The ultimate goal is not to take any of the individual cases to court, but to get alleged infringers to pay a substantial cash settlement to make legal action go away.

The math shows that this scheme could turn out to be extremely profitable for the parties involved. If ‘only’ 10,000 of the alleged infringers eventually pay a $2,000 settlement this would bring in $20 million. In comparison, that’s more than the $17 million The Hurt Locker grossed at the U.S. box office.


Full article here ...  http://torrentfreak.com/hurt-locker-makers-target-record-breaking-24583-bittorrent-users-110523/


Just a thought  ;D

if they only use the isp to track the offender , how do they know who actually downloaded the material ?




The First Troll

  • Guest
if they only use the isp to track the offender , how do they know who actually downloaded the material ?

Could they be expecting you to enter your address, passport number, credit card number etc. in your BT client?

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brettandlek

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They would net 20 million, that would refer to America only (i would imagine) and would cost them a truck load in court cost for them to have 10,000 people through the doors.
If they did it in other countries, imagine how much that would cost, good luck i say.
Just out of curiosity too, if you download something, i didnt think that in itself was illegal.
However, once you have downloaded it and seed for other people to download from you, effectively that is illegal?
Its a grey area, but anyone else know?


The First Troll

  • Guest
As far as I understand there is nothing illegal in downloading, as long as you don't copy it. But even that isn't true in every case.

There are abundant alternatives of legal downloading and copying. For music for example: http://www.onlinemusicrecorder.com/index.php
« Last Edit: May 24, 2011, 01:39:36 PM by The First Troll »


brettandlek

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Before i knew anything about the online torrent world i had a guy (as everyone does) who i used to buy new(ish) release movies from on DVD and he told me no problem downloading, but seeding for people to download for you or burn them onto a disc and get caught, look out.


Thaiphoon

  • Guest
Ive had a few goes trying to use BT's and in the end gave up , mainly due to the long download periods ( Days ) I decided to get a rapidshare premium account
and use that to download movies, documentaries and software . I set my download manager to start at around midnight , and normally get up in the morning with all the content waiting for me .