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Scancell cancer vaccines

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Online Roger

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Immunotherapy is beginning to change cancer treatments particularly in the USA and cancer will hopefully become not a 'terminal' but a chronic disease that is treatable. With respect to Scancell's science, even the word 'cure' is now being used.
Scancell have 2 platforms of science - 'Immunobody' - a vaccine injected with a small electrical charge with a device made by a USA Company, 'Ichor'. The vaccine is suitable for all and is completely non-toxic in contrast to other Immunotherapy products already in use.
The SCIB1 trial with late stage metastatic melanoma patients is completed and due to be published - the results are stunning. SCIB2 is ready for development and has up to 17 cancer targets.
The vaccines can be adapted on a 'plug and play' basis. A trial in the USA will commence soon at some of the top cancer Hospitals in the USA and managed by leading Cancer Doctors, using SCIB1 in combination with a new generation of Immunotherapy drugs, PD1 and PDL-1, known as checkpoint inhibitors which unveil cancer tumour for attack by the immune system - they have awful side effects. The immune system in such Patients is very weak BUT the Scancell vaccine stimulates that missing link enlivening the Immune system. SCIB1 also protects resected Melanoma patients from recurrence.

The second 'platform' of Scancell's science is 'Moditope' which goes into clinical trial later this year.
In the usual pre trials in humanised mice, Moditope has shown 100% yes 100% success in taking away advanced tumours. Further co-operation has started with the highly eminent Karolinska Institute in Sweden in addressing rheumatoid arthritis.

Putting myself on the line, I predict our CSO Dr Lindy Durrant, will get one maybe two Nobel prizes over the next few years. Scancell's science is stunning.

Scancell's strategy is to become a later stage development Company and achieve full value for this amazing science. The new Executive Chairman based in the USA is Dr John Chiplin and the trials involve Dr Keith Flaherty of Massachusets General and Harvard Medical School. Research is carried out in Nottingham and new offices are being opened in Oxford and San Diego.

Why am I telling you about this ? Well you know how it feels when a M8 backs a tip in the Grand National and you didn't know about it.

Seriously though, have a look at the BB for Scancell on LSE.co.uk under SCLP. The RNS section is worth digging into and the BB is currently constructive and free of trolls. And the website Scancell.co.uk.
The CEO Dr Richard Goodfellow features on youtube.

Have a look Guys and Gals - interesting as Humans to watch a little of what might one day be the end of radiotherapy, chemo and cancer as a terminal disease.

And at around 20 pence a share on the AIM market in the UK it is IMO, worth a look. DYOR.


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Offline Aussie

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Roger- Very interesting information.  It will be wonderful if this treatment lives up to its expectation.
Regards
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Online Roger

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Thanks CK - I've seen some of those.

Scancell announced a cooperation yesterday funded by a paltry £95,000 from the 'Headcase' charity for development of a vaccine for brain cancer for which there is no treatment atm. A tiny sum but a testament to the power of this 'plug and play' science.
We await news of which Pharma/Pharmas will be involved in the coming Combo trial with PD1 / PDL-1 checkpoint inhibitors which will cost $20 million at least.

The Patients on the SCIB1 melanoma trial have so far survived an average almost 4 years with no disease progression. SCIB2 is under development with several targets including I believe, triple negative breast cancer. SCIB3 prostate cancer.
SCIB4 brain cancer. Plug and play.

And the 'Moditope' promise of addressing latest stage tumours - trial imminent.

The market for cancer drugs is expected to be $150 billion dollars p.a. by 2020 - Scancell's current MC is around £50 million. Good fun to watch this.
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Online Roger

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CK I've had time now to try and read that link in detail. Have see many similar papers but this 'Nature' article is way way above my level of understanding. But I think it's pre-clinical work - interesting that Scancell's Immunobody platform is often described as a 'universal antigen delivery system'.
Of course Scancell have Patents in hand and Patents Pending.
But thanks and I'll alert the LSE BB to that one for discussion - some have a deeper grip of the subject than I do. ATB
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Online Roger

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Hi rdrokit I noticed that you were doing a course on Immunotherapy - how was it ?

Some links from the Scancell (cancer vaccines) site are below and I wonder if it may be of interest to you and others.

http://www.scancell.co.uk/products/product-pipeline
« Last Edit: September 11, 2016, 08:54:30 AM by Roger »
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Online rdrokit

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Hi rdrokit I noticed that you were doing a course on Immunotherapy - how was it ?

Some links from the Scancell (cancer vaccines) site are below and I wonder if it may be of interest to you and others.

http://www.scancell.co.uk/products/product-pipeline

Great course. I learned a lot about the immune system and immunology. Below are a few notes I made throughout the course.


Myeloid stem cell - produce red blood cells
Lymphoid stem cells - produce B cells & T cells.
Monocyte - largest of white blood cells. When they leave blood stream they become macrophages and found in lungs, skin and gut. Follow pathogens and destroy them with their granules.
Neutrophil - another type of white blood cell that are in high numbers in the blood stream. They use their toxic granules to destroy bacteria.
NK cells (natural killer) - react quickly -
The dendritic cell is really important for communication between white blood cells. The dendritic cells travel to lymph nodes to stimulate immune cells that are able to recognize the invading pathogen.
In the lymph nodes, T cells use their receptor to scan the dendritic cells for any pieces of foreign proteins displayed by their MHC molecules. The dendritic cells then activate the T cells and give them information on how to find the pathogens.
Helper T cells' main role is coordinating immune response, giving instructions to other types of immune cells.
The main job of cytotoxic T cells is to seek out infected cells displaying the same foreign protein on their MHC molecules and to kill them.
The other type of lymphocytes, B cells, also have specialized receptors on their surface, this time called B cell receptors. Ultimately, B cells that recognize foreign proteins or pathogens, such as bacteria, start making these in a form that can be released from the cell. These are called antibodies, and they can stick to the invading pathogens, stopping them in their tracks and marking them for destruction. B cells can also make antibodies that can stick to infected cells.
Cancer is caused by our own body's cells multiplying out of control. Cancer cells contain changes to their genetic code, their DNA, compared to normal cells. In other words, mutations-- making them subtly, but importantly, different. The fact that cancer cells are often self-sufficient in terms of growth signals, explaining how they grow outside of the normal controls. The fact that unlike normal cells, cancer cells can multiply indefinitely without stopping. They are essentially immortal.

 Immunosuppression - Research has shown that transplant recipients are at increased risk of a large number of different cancers. Some of these cancers can be caused by infectious agents, whereas others are not. The four most common cancers among transplant recipients and that occur more commonly in these individuals than in the general population are non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and cancers of the lung, kidney, and liver. NHL can be caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, and liver cancer by chronic infection with the hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viruses. Lung and kidney cancers are not generally thought to be associated with infection. People with HIV/AIDS also have increased risks of cancers that are caused by infectious agents, including EBV; human herpesvirus 8, or Kaposi sarcoma-associated virus; HBV and HCV, which cause liver cancer; and human papillomavirus, which causes cervical, anal, oropharyngeal, and other cancers. HIV infection is also associated with increased risks of cancers that are not thought to be caused by infectious agents, such as lung cancer.
Graft versus tumor effect (GvT) appears after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The graft contains donor T lymphocytes that are beneficial for recipient. Donor T-cells eliminate malignant residual host T-cells (graft versus leukemia) or eliminates diverse kinds of tumors.[1] GvT might develop after recognizing tumor-specific or recipient-specific alloantigens.[99] It could lead to remission or immune control of hematologic malignancies.[2] This effect applies in myeloma and lymphoid leukemias, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and possibly breast cancer.[3] It is closely linked with graft versus host disease phenoma (GvHD). CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) can be used to suppress GvHD without loss of beneficial GvT effect.[4] The biology of GvT response still isn’t fully understood but it is probable that the reaction with polymorphic minor histocompatibility antigens expressed either specifically on hematopoietic cells or more widely on a number of tissue cells or tumor-associated antigens is involved.[5][6] This response is mediated largely by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) but it can be employed by natural killers (NK cells) as separate effectors, particularly in T-cell-depleted HLA-haploidentical HSCT.
The abscopal effect is a phenomenon in the treatment of metastatic cancer where localized treatment of a tumor causes not only a shrinking of the treated tumor but also a shrinking of tumors in different compartments from the treated tumor. Initially associated with single-tumor, localized radiation therapy, the term has also come to encompass other types of localized treatments such as electroporation and intra-tumoral injection of therapeutics. While this phenomenon is extremely rare, its effect on the cancer can be stunning, leading to the disappearance of malignant growths throughout the entire body. Such success has been described for a variety of cancers, including melanoma, cutaneous lymphomas, and kidney cancer.
Scientists are not certain how the abscopal effect works to eliminate cancer in patients. Studies in mice suggest that the effect may depend upon activation of the immune system. In a case study reported at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City,[1] changes in a metastatic melanoma patient’s immune system were measured over the course of treatment. The team observed changes in tumor-directed antibody levels and immune cell populations that occurred at the time of the abscopal effect. These findings support the idea that a localized treatment may broadly stimulate the immune system to fight cancer. At this time, various immune system cells, including T-cells and dendritic cells, are believed to play a primary role.
Effects in tissues adjacent to the irradiated area are bystander effects and are not necessarily mediated by the same mechanisms as abscopal effects.
This strong immune response against a tumor even has a name-- the graft versus leukaemia effect. In rare cases, it has been reported that infection can lead to regression of cancer. Early clinicians attempted to treat tumors by injecting a combination of bacteria into them, and it was thought that the body's increased response to the bacteria also helped to fight the cancer. And today, injection of the BCG vaccine, which is usually used to vaccinate people against tuberculosis, into the bladder is used as a treatment for bladder cancer. It's still not entirely clear how this treatment works, but it seems to encourage the immune activation in the lining of the bladder, which helps to kill off the cancer cells.
Immune cells are able to migrate out of the blood and crawl through the tissues of the body ready to fight disease. And, in some cancers, it's been observed that, the more immune cells there are in the tumor, the slower the patient's cancer progresses. In fact, in some cases, the immune signature inside the tumor might be an even better indicator of how the disease will progress than traditional methods used for staging cancer. On top of this, there is a lot of evidence showing immune cell recognition of cancer cells in the laboratory, and this gives scientists much hope for the future of immunotherapy development.
So assuming the immune system does play a role in combating cancer, how then do tumour cells avoid being attacked?
Firstly, whereas infected cells can look quite different to the immune system from normal cells, often the changes in cancer cells are quite subtle so they can look pretty similar to the immune system. This means that in many cases they are inherently disguised. Despite this, by inspecting target cells closely, immune cells can potentially recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, cancer cells have a number of tactics they use to evade an immune cell poised to attack. Here, we will show you three tricks.
Firstly, cancer of cells can send direct messages in the form of small proteins called cytokines that tell the immune cells to ignore the cancer cell.
Secondly, T cells rely on special cellular MHC molecules that display bits of proteins that are located inside the cancer cell for recognition. If tumor cells lose these systems of surveillance, it effectively means they can escape close inspection.
Thirdly, cancer cells can exploit the fact that our immune cells have emergency off switches on their surface to prevent them going out of control. By pressing these off switches, cancer cells can turn off our immune cells when they are poised to attack. Finally, it's useful to think about cancer as evolving like in Darwinian evolution. Cancer cells can mutate and change over time, creating a diverse population of cells. The cancer cells that's are most adept at survival and about suppressing the immune system are the most likely to come to dominate the population. Understanding how this occurs is crucial if we are to develop novel approaches to cancer treatment.
Immunotherapy is an umbrella term that is applied to several different types of treatments, but each has the common aim to use the immune system to kill cancer cells. This might either involve rear whitening natural anti-tumor t-cells while boosting their numbers in the body or giving patients t-cells that have been reprogrammed to recognize cancer. These multiple strategies are necessary because there are so many different types of cancer, more than 200.
Understanding the immune signature inside a patient's tumor is critical if we are to develop new immunotherapy's for cancer. Immunohistochemistry, or IHC for short. And it's quite commonly used in the diagnosis to assess whether a patient is suitable for a drug therapy. Also used to examine the immune signature inside a tumor.
There are a number of B-cell tumors. So in adults, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia is the commonest leukaemia in adults. And it's usually a very slow and indolent leukaemia, which is treatable. But unfortunately, it's not curable. So there is an unmet need for those patients. In children, the commonest leukaemia is acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. And most children are cured with that leukaemia. But there are probably about 10% of children where, unfortunately, their disease hasn't been able to be cured. There are a number of other B-cell malignancies. You can get acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in adults, where the prognosis is actually quite poor. And then, most non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are B cell in origin.
Artificial T cell receptors (also known as chimeric T cell receptors, chimeric immunoreceptors, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs)) are engineered receptors, which graft an arbitrary specificity onto an immune effector cell. Typically, these receptors are used to graft the specificity of a monoclonal antibody onto a T cell; with transfer of their coding sequence facilitated by retroviral vectors. The receptors are called chimeric because they are composed of parts from different sources.
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) Artificial T cell receptors are under investigation as a therapy for cancer, using a technique called adoptive cell transfer.[1] T cells are removed from a patient and modified so that they express receptors specific to the particular form of cancer. The T cells, which can then recognize and kill the cancer cells, are reintroduced into the patient. Modification of T-cells sourced from donors other than the patient are also under investigation.
As you've heard previously, T cells carry a T cell receptor that enables them to recognize fragments of proteins. And some of these can recognize proteins expressed on cancer. However, sadly, in many cancer patients, such T cells a too few in number, and can't function very well, so they're unable to control the tumor. Therefore, one approach to treat these patients is to use genetic engineering to reprogram large numbers of their T cells, so that many more of them can now recognize and destroy the cancer. We can do this reprogramming of T cells in two different ways.
One approach is to introduce a gene that encodes a new T cell receptor, one that can recognize a protein on the cancer cell. The other approach is to introduce a gene that encodes what we call a chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR. A CAR is a fusion between an antibody that recognises cancer cells, and the signalling component of the T cell receptor. So when a T cell engineered to express such a CAR encounters a cancer cell, the antibody component binds to the cancer, and this will then deliver a signal to the T cell, causing it to kill that cancer cell. Key to the success of using these engineered T cells is the selection of an appropriate target protein.
Vaccines are one of the single greatest medical advances ever made, and have had a truly dramatic impact on human health. For many years now, immunologists have been trying to see if vaccines can be used to fight cancer. There are already some vaccines being used to prevent certain types of cancer from developing. One example is the human papilloma virus vaccine that is now being given to young women in many countries. This vaccine works by preventing infection with certain strains of papilloma virus that are associated with cervical cancer. We're already seeing good size of protection from cervical warts that these viruses can also cause. We hope to see that this protection extends to cancer, as well, in the future.


Online Roger

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For rdrokit and anyone else interested - an update from Scancell .....

16 September 2016 - Scancell Holdings Plc
Final Results for the year ended 30 April 2016
Highlights
    SCIB1 continues to deliver significant survival data from the Phase 1/2 clinical trial in patients with Stage III/IV melanoma
    Currently 19 of the 20 patients with resected tumours at study entry remain alive
    Of the 16 patients who received 2-4mg doses of SCIB1
       Median observation time since entry is 49 months, a landmark survival milestone
       Only two new incidences of disease progression have been recorded since December 2013
    Of the four patients who received 8mg doses of SCIB1
       Median observation time since entry is 18 months
       None have progressed and none have died
 As announced on 17 June 2016, treatment for the eight patients in the long-term continued dosing phase has been suspended due to the clinical trial supplies no longer being within the original specification. New SCIB1 material being manufactured to support a new study of SCIB1 in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor will also be made available to these continuation patients (subject to regulatory approval)
        Plans for the US clinical study of SCIB1 in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor remain on track, enrolment expected to commence in Q3 2017
        The final Clinical Study Report will be issued later this year and will support our US IND submission·         

Continued progress made in development of lead product, Modi-1, from Moditope® platform.   Enrolment for first-in-man clinical study in triple negative breast cancer, ovarian cancer and osteosarcoma expected to commence in early 2018.

 Strategic collaboration with Karolinska Institute to explore the role of citrullination in cancer, a key mechanism underpinning the Moditope® platform

 Post Period Highlights

    Scancell’s executive management team restructured to align expertise with the strategic direction outlined in fundraising
    Dr Alan Lewis appointed to Board as Non-Executive Director
    Opening of new offices in San Diego, US and Oxford, UK to support Company’s growth plans

Dr John Chiplin, Executive Chairman of Scancell, said:
“We have continued to make significant progress in the period, both in terms of the maturing clinical data with SCIB1 and further scientific developments on both the ImmunoBody® and Moditope® platforms.  We now have a pipeline of three products across five cancer indications and clinical success with any one of these products could transform the value of the business.  The Board believes that further clinical studies could add significant value to the Company and is continuing to explore a number of funding options to ensure that the Company has the resources to progress these programmes further.
“Scancell has arrived at an exciting point in its development.  We now have the opportunity to transform the business from a small UK-based and largely scientifically-based enterprise into an international force in immuno-oncology.  We remain committed to driving this process forward in the US and elsewhere, and to realising the value that has been accumulating over recent years, both for the benefit of our shareholders and cancer patients.”

Just MHO Guys but really exciting stuff ......

 
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Online Roger

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A balanced and lengthy report has been produced by 'Hardman and Co' about the progress made and the path ahead for Scancell. An interesting comparison is made with 'Innovio' who have a fraction of Scancell's potential and a Market Capitalisation 13 times greater.

rdrokit this is Immunotherapy in action - 56 pages of it. Fascinating stuff.

http://www.hardmanandco.com/docs/default-source/company-docs/scancell-documents/26.09.16-new-frontiers-in-t-cell-activation-and-targeting.pdf

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Online Roger

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Scancell get a mention in the Investor's Chronicle today - including the Chairman's view that SCIB1 is 'the best melanoma drug in the World' and if that is right, then the Company is a gold mine. (Or five).

The Hardman report linked before lists future trials :-

SCIB1 - outstanding results already for advanced melanoma patients as a stand alone treatment and a coming trial in combo with PD1/PDL1 checkpoint inhibitors.
SCIB1 Plus - melanoma again - accessing more patient 'types'
SCIB2 - Non-small cell lung cancer

Moditope 1 - Triple negative breast cancer
                 - Ovarian cancer
                 - Osteosarcoma

To emphasise - these are just the 5 chosen targets from 2 'plug and play' vaccine platforms. Impressive targets.

Exciting times in Immuno-Oncology.

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Online Roger

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Scancell have announced a coming USA based trial for SCIB2 in treating lung cancer - specifically 'non-small-cell-lung cancer' in combination with existing drugs :-

Oncoimmunology. 2016 Jun
Published online 2016 Apr 22.

"SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade....

Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10–40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses."

An exciting development and a massive market for this.

The 'Immunobody' platform now targeting both melanoma and lung cancer.
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Online Roger

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Heady days for Immunotherapy.

Richard Goodfellow, chief executive at drug research firm Scancell Holdings plc (LON:SCLP), tells Proactive Investors that he has high hopes for the company’s latest drug candidate, SCIB2.
“We’re very optimistic [about SCIB2] and that’s based upon new understanding around how the immune system works, to allow us to manipulate it to improve the prognosis of those patients,” he says.
Goodfellow explains that the lung cancer treatment did “all that we hoped it would in animals” and the company is now preparing SCIB2 for a Phase I clinical trial, which he says has already been designed.
Touching on the company’s lead product, SCIB1, Goodfellow says the skin cancer treatment is showing “remarkable” signs in its latest trials.
He also adds that he was “delighted” after Japanese biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi recently scooped the Nobel Prize for medicine for his work on autophagy, which links in closely with Scancell’s own research.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xrTGT2L8Pwo
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Online Roger

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Slides from the recent Scancell AGM presentation giving progress with the 'Immunobody' platform and 'Moditope' - have a look at Slide 13 if you have some time - the header for Moditope says -
"overcomes immuno suppression and delivers UNPRECEDENTED Killer T- Helper cell responses". That's the action that produced 100% yes 100% anti-tumour responses (melanoma) in pre-clinical trials. Worth a read ......

http://seekingalpha.com/article/4024764-scancell-scnlf-investor-presentation-slideshow
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Online Roger

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Only 6 minutes or so - Richard Goodfellow, Scancell's CEO talking about tremendous data from the melanoma trials, synergy with 'checkpoint inhibitors' and 'memory response' giving the prospect for long term protection from cancer recurrence.

http://www.proactiveinvestors.co.uk/companies/stocktube/6674/scancell-very-optimistic-about-us-study-after-compelling-melanoma-trial-results-6674.html
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Online rdrokit

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Online Roger

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Morning rdrokit and all.
Scancell's CEO Richard Goodfellow was presenting at a 'Proactive Investors' meeting in London last week and his words were recorded on a mobile and uploaded.
I listened very carefully and commented to my colleagues on the Scancell BB as follows.
(Btw CI means 'checkpoint inhibitors' now developed by all big Pharma - they are very expensive and can have horrendous side effects whilst helping just 20-30% of Patients).

'' I sat the laptop on my ear and it WAS worth all the effort. RG opens by noting that there was almost 'standing room only' at this event.

Tremendous progress is being made by Scancell with Immunobody's ability to produce 'ultra high avidity T-cells' and Moditope as being 'incredibly exciting', a 'unique proposition' with a 'SUPERB patent position' - further described as a 'land grab' with 'actually or virtually (?) all of the land', 'to our surprise'.

CI's are dominant in Immuno-Oncology treatment atm and Immunobody is 'exquisitely suitable for a combination market' in which the figures are 'mind boggling' estimated at $50 billion p.a. Some very big deals have been done eg. the Biontech deal at $300 million for a Phase 1 asset - (an indication - not a platform ?).

Immunobody at a very low dose gives a PHENOMENAL increase in T-cells.
(Car-T .. Kite and Juno mentioned as 'very complex, very expensive and very difficult').

I was particularly interested that after talking about the 3 drugs and 5 indications, RG mentions that 'there are other things at an earlier stage not being talked about'.

Talking about the Combo trial - yes Feb 14th for the pre-IND with the FDA and submission to FDA by the end of Q1, hoping for approval Q2 and all geared up to start trial Q3 this year !

RG then uses stronger words (yes that's possible) about the Combo strategy - 'the CI / Immunobody mecahnisms are exquisitely PERFECT to combine'. Sweet Lord ! RG then describes again the full whammy of Immunobody, (my words), CI exposes, Immunobody's ultra high avidity T-Cells attack, Immunobody gives further expression of PDL-1 on the cell surface to further assist the CI action AND the exciting recent discovery of the creation of 'Immune Memory', retaining protection against re-challenge by the cancer later.

RG is pressed for time and quickly notes the 'fantastic market' for combo AND for adjuvant'.

Moving onto Moditope, which is 'uniquely patented for cancer by us'. The wonderful comment re. 100% survival of mice with heavy tumour load - 100% survival from a single injection - 'can't get mice to die'.
Further - can't tell if Moditope works with CI yet - NO model arises which allows for any increase with CI. Ouch !
And 'Moditope is scientifically fantastic'.

We ARE in active discussions NOW on partnering with many Pharma across all indications and on both platforms.

I listened and re-listened to this. Quote marks may be exact or not but E.& O.E, correct in meaning. Excuse the use of some Caps ! VGLA
''

Have a nice day All.
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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rdrokit - thanks for that BKK Post link.
I'm guessing that the unnamed drugs featured will be Checkpoint Inhibitors, (CI).
Maybe used in combination with chemotherapy.

I have heard a little about one melanoma drug, 'Yervoy' or Ipilumumab - in a large trial in the USA there were reports that 5 Patients died from side effects and half the Patients had to be withdrawn from treatment due to side effects. There is a Group of Yervoy lawyers in the USA dedicated to suing on Patients behalf. 20-30% of Patients benefit.

If one had Stage 3/4 melanoma and a poor prognosis, Yervoy is a step forward over nothing at all.

Scancell's Immunobody and Moditope are still relatively unknown.

You saw the 2016 Nobel for Medicine went to Yoshinori Ohsumi for 'discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy'. I am told, (though it's beyond my understanding), this is central to Prof. Lindy Durrant's work at Scancell. ATB
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Online Roger

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rdrokit. I've been in this 5 years or more.
Scancell have 2 'plug and play' platforms.

Immunobody has 95% of Melanoma stage 3 and 4 Patients alive - some for 5 years. And a combo trial with CI next. And a non small cell lung cancer trial to start in the USA.

Moditope has trials starting with ovarian cancer, osteosarcoma and triple negative breast cancer. Our Prof. Lindy was dancing around the Lab when she found Moditope. Pre-clinical survival with heavy tumour load - 100%. Nobels for her - any bets ?

Don't mean to be a bore but you know how you get told off, when a horse wins - why didn't you tell me ?

Just for the cynics - I've got nothing to gain. Just sharing.

DYOR but read more at Scancell.co.uk or LSE.co.uk moniker SCLP

If you have been abroad more than 2 years there's no CGT I understand and you can buy/sell with online trading if you have a UK Bank Account.

14.75 pence - ridiculously cheap IMVHO. ATB

''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein