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Scancell cancer vaccines

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Online Roger

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As I see my average 17p per share investment in Scancell at 5.6p, here's what we have in this Company now.

Stolen from my colleagues Crumbs and Ray Pointer, in the LSE chatroom, here's a list - bearing in mind that when the SCIB1 melanoma vaccine was still in Phase 2 trial, on the morning that the 'serendipitous' discovery of Moditope was announced, the price soared to 60 pence or more inside a few hours :-

''I know it's been done before but a comparison of the MCAP at its peak some time after Moditope was announced

GBP 100 million post Moditope announcement with :-

No SCIB1 trial results
Moditope announced . . . . . . . .

**************************************

Now GBP 23 million with :-

Immunobody
SCIB1 outstanding results
Patents complete
SCIB1 combo trial starts soon (we hope)
SCIB2 combo trial funded by CRUK (probably starting next year)
Glioblastoma vaccine collaboration

Moditope
Patents almost complete for citrullinated targets
Modi trial starts soon (we hope)
Addition of amplivant to Moditope
Modi2 may now be in development
Collaboration with Biontech for 2 targets on TCR going well
Appointment of TCR specialist scientist
Collaboration with Karolinska

Glycans
Patent process underway

Scientific endorsements
Peer review of SCIB1 trial
SCIB1 combo trial managed by Keith Flaherty
CRUK funding of SCIB2 combo trial
Project blueprint team members
BionTech collaboration
Karolinska collaboration
Lindy winning Waldenström award

And finally, (Prof.) Lindy is asking the question :-


http://www.portlandpresspublishing.com/sites/default/files/biochemist/Biochemist%20Immunology%20issue/BioFEB19Web_Choudhury%29.pdf  ''

Plenty of news to come. Meantime . . . as my old Pal Spargo says in Cornwall, ''can't help poverty Boy".

 
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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My 'ailing' investment (SCLP) stands at 7.25 pence per share now   :-\ 
But here's a most impressive slide show on World Cancer day. Really worth a look if you have time.

Immuno-Oncology is changing the world of cancer treatment and little Scancell now has 3 platforms and three products going into trial this year.

https://www.scancell.co.uk/Data/Sites/1/media/docspres/presentation-to-lsx-world-congress-february-2020.pdf
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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My 'ailing' investment (SCLP) stands at 7.95 pence per share now, after hitting 3.6 pence recently (but 64 pence in 2012)  :-\  Trial progress has been interrupted but Scancell announced this week that they have a project for a CV-19 vaccine . .

https://www.scancell.co.uk/development-of-vaccine-against-covid-19

In Today's Times, (Prof. Lindy Durrant is CSO of Scancell) :-

"British researchers are entering the race to develop a Covid-19 vaccine by modifying an existing cancer therapy. The candidate vaccine, under development at Nottingham University, would focus on stimulating elements of the immune system called T-cells, which scientists suspect hold the key to longer-term immunity. Human trials could be held in the autumn.

Lindy Durrant, a professor of cancer immunotherapy at Nottingham, has developed a technique where DNA is injected into patients to create T-cells that recognise and destroy cancer cells. Her team are modifying the technique to produce T-cells that attack and kill cells that have been infiltrated. “Most vaccines stimulate strong neutralising antibodies but weak T-cell responses. Although this is good enough for many viruses, for coronaviruses it seems that strong T-cell responses are also required,” Professor Durrant said.

Discussion around the development of a Covid-19 jab has focused on antibodies, proteins that stick to the virus and prevent it from entering cells. However, scientists believe that T-cells are critical. “It’s interesting that in Sars [another coronavirus] the long-term immunity is all T-cells, not the antibodies,” said Sir John Bell, regius professor of medicine at Oxford. “The antibodies go away after two years. But the speculation is that you can still have residual T-cell reactivity for about five or six years.” Sir John added that a candidate vaccine being developed at Oxford, which went into human trials last week, had been designed to produce both antibodies and a T-cell response.

The Nottingham vaccine will take a different approach. It will contain pieces of DNA that should enter the nuclei of the muscle cells into which it is injected. This will provide the instruction for the cells to produce two types of protein. One is from the nucleocapsid of the virus that causes Covid-19 — the spherical container that holds its genetic material. The other is from the spikes that protrude from the surface of the virus, which it uses to latch on to and invade human cells. Several other vaccines, including Oxford’s and one being developed at Imperial College, focus on the spike protein. However, Professor Durrant suspects that the nucleocapsid protein will induce a more potent T-cell response. It is also similar across most types of coronavirus, which could make it useful for a range of pathogens. “These T-cells may also give protection against other related coronaviruses and any new ones that may arise in the future,” she said
."

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/fad1c73e-8be7-11ea-8030-261bf7d8ac38?shareToken=8137ff5c9ed028980d50788834e42db6
« Last Edit: May 02, 2020, 04:46:30 PM by Roger »
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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From a poster on a 'Scancell' forum . . . "I still think that the Scancell approach looks to be the most interesting. Has anyone seen mention of another approach that uses both Antibodies and TCells to neutralise the virus? The fact that studies are beginning to indicate that people who have recovered have long lasting memory TCells but only weak antibody protection is IMO significant. Here's an article about the SARS coronavirus https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2362397/

And from a more recent article about covid19 . . "“Antibodies are not the only answer,” says Iwasaki. “We don’t know why the people recovered but I suspect it was because they had a very good T cell response.”
The sample size in this study was small, so whether that ratio of convalescent patients with and without antibodies scales up to the larger population remains to be seen."
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200421-will-we-ever-be-immune-to-covid-19

Back to Immunobody. This has probably been posted a number of times but it is well worth a read for those new to Scancell " As a result of both the direct and cross-presentation, the T cells not only have a higher avidity (up to 100-fold increased potency), but there are many more T cells generated against the epitopes of interest." And . . "“Vaccines are the long-term solution and we believe our combined high avidity T cell and neutralizing antibody approach has the potential to produce a second-generation vaccine that will generate an effective and durable immune response to COVID-19,” said Professor Lindy Durrant, Chief Scientific Officer Scancell." https://www.scancell.co.uk/immunobody

ME - I hope that's of interest. Nice weekend to you . . .
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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The DM is rightly much maligned for it's gossip/celebrity obsessions but it does do some things very well. A section 'AND THERE IS A CANCER LINK' in this article strikes some chords. Scancell is onto this chain already . . .

"The immune system has two lines of defence: innate immunity, which includes 'natural killer' and other types of cell that are on the lookout for any bacteria, virus or fungus which might look foreign; and the adaptive or acquired immune system. This second type of defence is a set of more specialised cells, unique to each of us, that has developed over our lifetime to recognise and destroy any invader that has tried to attack our body in the past. Covid-19 only emerged at the end of last year, so human immune systems have never been exposed to it and have no prepared defences. Our bodies, therefore, have to rely on innate immunity — natural killer and so-called T-cells, along with other types of defence cells."

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8308883/Is-inflammation-link-dementia-cancer-coronavirus.html

''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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Hi Caller. Can you get behind the paywall in the "Times'? When you have time, could you please do a search for Prof. Lindy Durrant (Scancell's CSO) as there is comment there today on Scancell's CV-19 'Covidity' project with the two Nottingham Unis. Thanks.
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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In the 'Sunday People' (?) - "The researchers led by Professor Lindy Durrant, are testing on mice and human trials could begin in the Autumn if funding is secured. Prof Durrant SAID: " The technology is there because our vaccine came from cancer patients. As soon as we have more data in mice, we can move to humans. If you have good T cell memory it should last longer. It could potentially last 5 to 6 years."

A full explanation of Scancell's 'Covidity' project and worth a full read IF you are interested . . . A vaccine maybe giving 'years' of immunity   ;D

"Scancell Holdings plc, (Oxford, UK), a developer of novel immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer, has initiated a research program to develop a novel DNA vaccine for COVID-19. The research program will be in collaboration with scientists from the newly established Centre for Research on Global Virus Infections and the new Biodiscovery Institute at the University of Nottingham (Nottingham, UK) and Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham, UK).

Scancell's DNA vaccines target dendritic cells to stimulate high avidity T cells that survey and destroy diseased cells. This approach was highly successful with Scancell's lead ImmunoBody cancer vaccine, SCIB1, which was safely administered to patients with malignant melanoma, and mediated excellent five-year survival in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial. Scancell's aim is to utilize its proven clinical expertise in cancer to produce a simple, safe, cost-effective and scalable vaccine to induce both durable T cell responses and virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAbs) against COVID-19. As research data emerges, it is becoming increasingly clear that the induction of potent and activated T cells may play a critical role in the development of long-term immunity and clearance of virus-infected cells
."

https://www.hospimedica.com/covid-19/articles/294782018/dna-based-vaccine-could-deliver-potent-and-long-lasting-responses-to-covid-19.html
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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Scancell's CV-19 vaccine - just 3 minutes on this 'Sky News' item below. Worth a watch - this may be the CV-19 solution for us old biggers  8) 

"The prototype is a tiny gold bullet coated in DNA. A separate team at Nottingham University say their coronavirus vaccine prototype has considerable advantages, but has been overlooked. Lindy Durrant, professor of cancer immunotherapy at the university, said the government should keep its options open in case other vaccines fail to work. "Please give us some money," she said. "We have an exciting approach. It could be the answer." "

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjCLjeGhcEc

https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-scientists-warn-government-is-putting-big-bets-on-vaccines-that-may-not-work-12004889
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


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''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


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Scancell's T cell vaccine project - 535,000 views now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_DAkPMpTuw
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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Mark Austin's 'News Hour' last evening at 6pm - the Prof. Janet Daly interview is first on. Just maybe it will appear here later in the windows below ? https://www.youtube.com/skynews Prof. Daly at Notts Uni is part of the team working on Scancell's 2nd Generation vaccine.

I enjoyed the section where Prof. Daly is talking about updated vaccines as an 'arms race with other weapons up our sleeve'. And questioned about changes to the Oxford vaccine, she diverted to talk about the 'potential for another generation of vaccines targeting other proteins'.

The other protein being the nucleosid at the centre of the virus rather than the fast mutating spike.

We'll see  8)
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


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""Exclusive: 'Universal vaccine' that can conquer all variants could be available within a year thanks to British scientists

Vaccines are being developed that target proteins found in the core of the coronavirus - ending the need to keep tweaking existing jabs By Jennifer Rigby, Global Health Security Correspondent 13 February 2021 • 12:36pm

A universal vaccine that would work on all Covid-19 variants by targeting the core of the virus instead of just the spike protein could be available in as little as a year, researchers say.

British scientists at the University of Nottingham are developing a "universal” Covid-19 vaccine which, if successful, would end the need to keep tweaking existing jabs as the virus mutates.

Existing vaccines like the Pfizer and AstraZeneca jabs target the spike protein of the virus, but their efficacy is expected to wane as this element of the virus mutates.

Already there is evidence they do not protect as well against variants containing the “E484K” mutation, such as those circulating widely in southern Africa and Brazil.

The new universal vaccines will also target proteins found in the core of the virus which are far less likely to mutate, meaning they would protect against all current variants and would theoretically have greater longevity.

Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust who sits on Sage, the Government advisory committee, was among a number of influential scientists this week to suggest Governments' strategies should switch to more universal vaccines.

Backing an article in the influential Nature journal titled Variant-proof vaccines: invest now for the next pandemic, he tweeted: "We agree - and being acted upon by CEPI (Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations) and others." 

UK company Scancell, which specialises in developing cancer vaccines, and several other firms from Europe and the US are already working on variant proof jabs and hope to prove shortly they can produce an effective immune response. 

Alongside scientists from the University of Nottingham, Scancell is targeting a protein in the core of the virus called the nucleocapsid or “N” protein, alongside the spike protein. Human trials of their vaccine will begin in the second half of this year, after positive results from testing the jab on mice.

The DNA-based product seems to stimulate a good antibody and T-cell response. Scancell chief medical officer Dr Gillies O’Bryan-Tear, told The Telegraph: “We don’t necessarily claim it will be a pan-coronavirus vaccine, but it has got the potential to be so simply because of where it is targeted.”

A number of other biotechs are working on similar jabs, including myNEO in Belgium, and Osivax in France. The latter has just completed a phase II clinical trial of a universal flu vaccine that also targets the N protein. 

MyNeo, meanwhile, has used modelling to suggest which parts of the virus might remain stable longest, allowing them to maximise vaccine longevity.

Other researchers in the US suggest using a previously-developed Sars vaccine, or a vaccine with several different coronaviruses programmed in, could stimulate broader protection.

These products could not only protect against all variants of the pandemic Sars-CoV-2 virus, but other coronaviruses, like Sars and Mers, and future coronaviruses. However, universal Covid vaccines face significant hurdles. Experts note that scientists have been working for decades without success on a universal flu vaccine, for example.

Professor Danny Altmann, an immunologist at Imperial College, said: “It’s not science fiction, but it’s not trivial.” Scancell has had some funding from Innovate UK, but needs a big pharmaceutical partner in order to progress its new vaccine through clinical trials, and new investment of several hundred million pounds.

"But with this in place, and positive results from phase I/II trials, its vaccine could be developed within a year, it said

"There is no reason why, if we get a partner, we shouldn't be able to do it as quickly as the others have done it," said Dr O'Bryan-Tear, noting that the first coronavirus vaccines emerged less than a year after the pandemic began.

However, scientists also stressed that at the moment there may not be a need for new vaccines.

As yet, no evidence has conclusively shown that the existing vaccines are ineffective against the new variants, although others are expected to emerge.

Dr O’Bryan-Tear said: “I think the pandemic will be around for two or three more years, because of supply, because of not being able to vaccinate developing countries. During that time, the virus will mutate, so there are plenty of opportunities for new entrants to try their hand.” ""

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/02/13/exclusive-universal-vaccine-can-conquer-covid-variants-could/
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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Scancell's 'Covidity' is all over the newswires now. Developed from Scancell's 'Immunobody' platform which has already shown success in Stage 3/4 Melanoma and is fully patented - Covidity is apparently being manufactured by Cobra already for Phase 1/2a safety trials in humans.

Exciting news - this could be the one to finally slay Covid  :)

Scancell have labs in Notts Uni where Prof. Lindy Durrant (CSO) also works. The Notts Uni's have been helping Scancell on the delivery system for the vaccine - they must have cracked it as the trial batch is in manufacture.

Now Sky News (again) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpuNIUraPy8&feature=youtu.be
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein


Online Roger

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Prof. Lindy Durrant of Scancell . . .

Current Research - "Lindy is Professor of Cancer Immunotherapy at the University of Nottingham and CSO of Scancell Ltd. She has developed a panel of mabs recognised tumour associated glycans and has pioneered an new antibody engineering technology which enhances the avidity of mabs, termed Avidimabs. This has been applied to the anti-glycan mabs resulting in direct killing mabs. She has developed two vaccine platforms ImmunoBodyTM and ModitopeTM which induce potent killer CD8 T cells and and cytotoxic CD4 T cells to post-translational modifications respectively. The first ImmunoBodyTM, SCIB1, has completed a phase I/II clinical trial in which 14/16 patients with melanoma have been disease free for five years. The first product from the ModitopeTM platform will enter the clinic this year. Lindy has over 150 peer reviewed publications and is also the inventor on 66 patents. She was award of the Waldenstrom prize for cancer Immunotherapy in 2019."

Not only for treatment of cancers but also, the prospect of a vaccine as a general preventative - (this Lady is not given to wild claims . . . .)

Future Research - "We have identified a common process that occurs in most cancer that can be recognised by the immune system. This would allow us to design a vaccine to stimulate an immune response which would recognise and kill early cancerous cells. This may have to be boosted yearly as for seasonal flu vaccines. It could be given to people at high risk of cancer or to adults over 60 which are the most common age group for this disease.

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/medicine/people/lindy.durrant
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Online Roger

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Little ole' Scancell's Covidity project comes to the attention of CEPI - only one other 2nd Gen project mentioned :-

"To date, CEPI has secured financial support from Australia, Austria, Belgium, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Canada, Denmark, the European Commission, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USAID, Ethiopia, The Republic of Korea, Indonesia, and Wellcome. Additionally, CEPI has also received support from private sector entities as well as public contributions through the UN Foundation COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund."

" . . . .  scientists at the University of Nottingham in the UK are working alongside pharmaceutical company Scancell and Nottingham Trent University to test its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, SN14, which targets both the spike protein as well as the nucleocapsid, or N-protein. By targeting this additional viral structure, which is far less likely to mutate, the vaccine if found safe and effective could work to protect people against COVID-19 irrespective of any mutations to the spike protein and, in theory, could work across other coronaviruses."

https://cepi.net/news_cepi/going-universal-the-search-for-an-all-in-one-coronavirus-vaccine/

Another enlightening read here : https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-00340-4
''If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough'' - Albert Einstein