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Passengers in the back of pick-up trucks is strictly prohibited

Alfie · 50 · 1173

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Offline Alfie

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The carrying of passengers in the back of pick-up trucks is strictly prohibited according to Article 44 which is currently effective, requiring all passengers to be seated in passenger seats with seatbelts fastened.


And apparently the government wants everybody to obey traffic laws during Songkran.   :D


Quote
The Prime Minister has advised the people to obey traffic rules and only play with water aboard pickup trucks in community areas during Songkran festival.

Government Spokesman Lt Gen Sansern Kaewkamnerd said the premier had expressed his concerns regarding water plays aboard pickup trucks during Songkran holiday and suggested that the people may do so only when their vehicles are parked, or moving slowly in community areas or on local roads, and not on the highways.

Those in the provinces where the main Songkran festival will be held on the main roads can discuss with the police if they can play with water aboard pickup trucks and if the vehicle may be moving at a slow speed.

However, the carrying of passengers aboard pick-up trucks’ rear section is strictly prohibited according to Article 44 which is currently effective, requiring all passengers to be seated in passenger seats with seatbelts fastened.

The general public are also advised to obey the traffic rules and to drive within the legal speed limit, and encouraged to take pictures of any road accident with their smart phones, which can be considered by the authorities as additional evidence.

NNT
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Offline Alfie

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Well, that didn't last long, did it!    :D



Prayut postpones new road safety regulations



Prime Minister Prayut Chanocha has postponed the new regulations prohibiting passengers from riding in the cargo bed of pickup trucks and in the rear of extended pickups, until after Songkran, a senior police officer said on Wednesday.

Assistant Police Commissioner General, Pol Lt Gen Wittaya Prayongpan, said the postponement was to minimise the impact on the public.

Police and related agencies will spend 15 days explaining the bans and the rules will be enforced and fines will be handed out after Songkran.

The new rule, which was to be officially enforced on Wednesday, was heavily criticised. It authorised police to impose fines ranging from Bt100 to Bt500 on violators.

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30311436
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Online Pompui

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The carrying of passengers in the back of pick-up trucks is strictly prohibited according to Article 44 which is currently effective, requiring all passengers to be seated in passenger seats with seatbelts fastened.


And apparently the government wants everybody to obey traffic laws during Songkran.   :D


Quote
The Prime Minister has advised the people to obey traffic rules and only play with water aboard pickup trucks in community areas during Songkran festival.

Government Spokesman Lt Gen Sansern Kaewkamnerd said the premier had expressed his concerns regarding water plays aboard pickup trucks during Songkran holiday and suggested that the people may do so only when their vehicles are parked, or moving slowly in community areas or on local roads, and not on the highways.

Those in the provinces where the main Songkran festival will be held on the main roads can discuss with the police if they can play with water aboard pickup trucks and if the vehicle may be moving at a slow speed.

However, the carrying of passengers aboard pick-up trucks’ rear section is strictly prohibited according to Article 44 which is currently effective, requiring all passengers to be seated in passenger seats with seatbelts fastened.

The general public are also advised to obey the traffic rules and to drive within the legal speed limit, and encouraged to take pictures of any road accident with their smart phones, which can be considered by the authorities as additional evidence.

NNT


"OOOOHHHH, SLOW DOWN, there's an accident on the other side of the road. I've got to video it". SCREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEECH, BANG.
Now there's an accident on both sides of the road or at the very least, a big tailback. One of the main causes of accidents is rubbernecking. How about teaching people what to do if there's an accident and have them help the crash victims instead standing there videoing people who could be dying.

As for the seat belt issue, it's not only Thailand. In Singapore you are required to belt up, front and rear, in a car. Only Bangladeshi construction or shipyard workers are allowed to ride in the back of trucks without seat belts.

 IMHO you can preach and extend driving training all you want but, it will only be when the police enforce traffic rules at all times and not just road blocks, when a database is made and repeat offenders sent to court with the threat of jail time and when Thais stop believing that if I die or have a bad accident then it was meant to happen that things will change.
 For the first point there are probably not enough Police officers to stop everyone and they might not care if there's nothing in it for them if there was. Secondly, Thai prisons are way overcrowded so a bunch of traffic violations probably wouldn't get you sent to jail unless you had killed a dozen people and thirdly, it's in their culture.
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Offline nookiebear

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What a U Turn!!!Laughable..............he is making almost as many as Donald Trump
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Offline Hector

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I still don't quite understand the situation regarding pax in the cab of the pickup on the bench seat behind the front seats where there are no seat belts.  Are we now expected to get them put in?  I reckon this whole idea is not only poorly thought out (surprise?) but is as good as an ATM for the police.


Offline nookiebear

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I still don't quite understand the situation regarding pax in the cab of the pickup on the bench seat behind the front seats where there are no seat belts.  Are we now expected to get them put in?  I reckon this whole idea is not only poorly thought out (surprise?) but is as good as an ATM for the police.
The answer is YES
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Offline John Doe

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The rule has been changed ONLY for the 3 weeks of Songkran.
Dirong Songkran, people my take place INSIDE the can (with seatbelts ON).
After Songkran, no people are allowed on the back of a pickup.

http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/pickup-can-carry-no-six-passengers-back-government-spokesman/


Passengers can sit in the cab of a pickup truck and no more than six passengers can ride on the back of the same vehicle as the government has agreed to ease the seat belt regulation during the Songkran festival in order not to cause too much trouble to the public who are not ready to adjust to the new measure.
Government spokesman Lt-Gen Sansern Kaewkamnerd, however, said that the reprieve would be temporary in order to give more time for public to make adjustments. He insisted that the regulation would be strictly enforced for public safety.

As for private cars, the spokesman said police would strictly enforce the seat belt regulation requiring the driver and all passengers to fasten seat belts. However, during the initial stage, he said police might give a warning if any of the passengers were found to not fasten a seat belt.

The regulation will be strictly applied to taxis, passenger vans and inter-provincial buses.

Also during the Spongkran festival, police will get tough with drunk driving, speeding and reckless driving in an attempt to reduce road accidents during the festive period.

 


Offline John Doe

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I still don't quite understand the situation regarding pax in the cab of the pickup on the bench seat behind the front seats where there are no seat belts.  Are we now expected to get them put in?  I reckon this whole idea is not only poorly thought out (surprise?) but is as good as an ATM for the police.
The answer is YES

In fact, it is very simple.
1. The back of a cab is a "cargo" space.
This means that there are no real seats behind the driver and there are no doors giving access to the back of the cab.
Passengers are not allowed in that space.
Even if you would put "seats" and/or seatbelts in that space, ir is forbidden to transport people in that space.
2. The back of a cab is an extended space.
This means that there are real seats and seatbelts behind the driver and there are access doors to the back of the cab.
Passengers are allowed in that space.


Offline Anton

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1. The back of a cab is a "cargo" space.
This means that there are no real seats behind the driver and there are no doors giving access to the back of the cab.
Passengers are not allowed in that space.
Even if you would put "seats" and/or seatbelts in that space, ir is forbidden to transport people in that space.
2. The back of a cab is an extended space.
This means that there are real seats and seatbelts behind the driver and there are access doors to the back of the cab.
Passengers are allowed in that space.

Two of my friends have pick-ups (a Toyota and a Nissan) with hybrid 1 1/2 door solution on both sides, and a bench in the back, similar to what shown in this photo but without safety belts behind. The half doors cannot be opened independently without opening also the regular ones. I'm asking on their behalf:

- Is that considered as a "cargo" or as an "extended" space?
- Are they required to install belts now?
- What if it is not possible to install belts?
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Offline Hector

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Anton, this was exactly my point - which John Doe seems to have missed.  There is no clear ruling on this yet, according to a well informed contact I trust.  In addition to the points you make, I took my own pick up to see if belts could be fitted for the bench seat and was told that there were no anchor points, so these would have to be created as well - not easy givenn the thickness of metal there.  The other bit of advice from the garage was to hold off a while as it was distinctly possible that the whole issue would either go away or be made much clearer after Songkran.  (Don't hold your breath waiting!)


Offline Anton

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There is no clear ruling on this yet, according to a well informed contact I trust.  In addition to the points you make, I took my own pick up to see if belts could be fitted for the bench seat and was told that there were no anchor points, so these would have to be created as well - not easy givenn the thickness of metal there.  The other bit of advice from the garage was to hold off a while as it was distinctly possible that the whole issue would either go away or be made much clearer after Songkran.

Thank you very much for the reply, Hector.

(Don't hold your breath waiting!)

An essenial component of our everyday survival kit over here  ;D
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Online KiwiCanadian

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In addition to the points you make, I took my own pick up to see if belts could be fitted for the bench seat and was told that there were no anchor points, so these would have to be created as well

This could be the major stumbling block. To have somchai put the seat belt bolt thru the floor pan, only to have the bolts rip thru under heavy braking due to a 120kg gorilla sitting in the back seat. No vehicle manufacturer would want to have any part of that unless it was tested by them, of course this comes at a price that somchai cannot afford. Another catch 22.
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Online Roger

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KC and all - be careful. I helped my ex/late Father in Law collect a small new Honda, after the great hurricane of 87 ? Living at Helford Passage, I went to Newquay and took him back to Helston to pick it up. Then we went back to my house and BBQ'd the whole freezer as there had been no power for 3 days ! Some years later, my ex-wife's Sister and her Husband, an Iranian, (actually a totally nice Guy), bought it from said FIL. A few years after that, I bought the Honda for my ex-Missis.
I removed their child's car seat.

Coming back from Newquay to Falmouth area, I stopped to fill up the petrol tank.
Then I found petrol sloshing around in the rear footwell !

Good Iranian had fitted a child seat, with a bolt, that went down through the floor and also through the top of the petrol tank. (When I filled the tank up it spurted through to the car).

I stopped again shortly and left the car for repair. Was I a smoker, I would have been burned alive without a doubt. Care needed.

As for Thailand, The Govt must think these changes through, 50 times, before making a much needed rule.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2017, 06:15:26 AM by Roger »
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Online KiwiCanadian

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Exactly that Roger I agree 100%

Every somchai will try his best to do something to comply with the law, but shit like that will happen, both murphy and darwin are out there in full force, LOL

They need to have a 1yr grace period and have accredited installers that are registered with the police AND engineering institutions to ensure a safe means of attaching the required seat belts, They should be at least a 3 point seat belt.

A truck I had, as a daily driver, I had installed a 4 point harness, did that ever hold you in place no need for airbags (actually this was before airbags where mandatory).
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Online Pompui

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Exactly that Roger I agree 100%

Every somchai will try his best to do something to comply with the law, but shit like that will happen, both murphy and darwin are out there in full force, LOL

I can just see Somchai lashing his kids to the removable bench seat with rope and thinking that's job done.

They need to have a 1yr grace period and have accredited installers that are registered with the police AND engineering institutions to ensure a safe means of attaching the required seat belts, They should be at least a 3 point seat belt.

Nice idea but, TIT and I can't see that ever happening unless someone in power just happens to own a nationwide car servicing company that just happens to win any contract that is put out to tender.

A truck I had, as a daily driver, I had installed a 4 point harness, did that ever hold you in place no need for airbags (actually this was before airbags where mandatory).


[/quote]

This could be the major stumbling block. To have somchai put the seat belt bolt thru the floor pan, only to have the bolts rip thru under heavy braking due to a 120kg gorilla sitting in the back seat. No vehicle manufacturer would want to have any part of that unless it was tested by them, of course this comes at a price that somchai cannot afford. Another catch 22.
[/quote]

Quite right KC. This is why I think that it would be easier to just make a grandfather clause for any vehicle registered before this law became effective. Just like certain things are on older cars in the UK
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Offline John Doe

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A clear description in THAI about the new rules.
The "x" means "NO PASSENGERS".


Online Roger

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That poster is really clear ! But just MO - there is so little room in the mini-seats in the half cab that any passengers are much restrained by the back of the front seats - Govt. could leave that as it is. IMO no chance of that being enforced in the load area.
For Lam Yai (Longyen fruit) harvesting, teams of 10 to 15 workers sit in the load area to get to the farms to pick the fruit. The same for cassava lifting etc etc.
Agriculture would be badly affected.
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Online Roger

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The Honda I was wittering about was actually a Triumph Acclaim, based on and sharing an engine with the Honda Ballade of that time. A good little car.
The mountings for the child seat straps were under the back seat.
A 1/2'' bolt about 3'' long, went through the floor AND the top of the petrol tank - it had moreorless sealed for a year or two until I took the bolt out !
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Online rdrokit

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The new seat belt law is long overdue but will probably take another long time to get everyone to obey the law.

Now what about songthaews. All those people jammed in without seat belts. Technically a songthaew is a pickup truck.


Online Pompui

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The new seat belt law is long overdue but will probably take another long time to get everyone to obey the law.

Now what about songthaews. All those people jammed in without seat belts. Technically a songthaew is a pickup truck.

Good point. I can't see the pick up manufacturers being too impressed with this new law. I'm sure it will have an impact on sales.
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